Rabbit insurance

Rabbit insurance can be valuable cover to have in place to protect your beloved bunny in a time of need. Find out more with our guide.


Beatrix Potter was famously fond of Peter Rabbit and Benjamin Bunny, and if you're a rabbit owner you'll know how she felt.

So the thought of anything happening to your pet could be devastating.

Whether your beloved bunny is a fully house-trained companion or lives in a hutch at the bottom of the garden, having adequate rabbit insurance is the best way to protect their health.

What is rabbit insurance?

Rabbit insurance, like other forms of pet insurance, protects your beloved animal if things go wrong.

As with most types of insurance there are budget options, but they do not usually offer as much cover as a premium policy

Your bunny could have an accident or become ill and, as vet bills are rising, you might find the cost of treatment too expensive without the right insurance in place.

Also, some rabbit insurance policies cover things you might not have expected. Did you know, for example, you can access behavioural treatment and alternative therapy for your bunny?

How much does rabbit insurance cost?

This depends on things such as where you live and whether or not you own a show rabbit. Some policies cover multiple animals whilst others require you to insure each separately.

As with most types of insurance there are budget options, but they don't usually offer as much cover as a premium policy.

Where can I buy rabbit insurance?

Not all pet insurers cover bunnies but Gocompare.com has teamed up with ExoticDirect,[1] a specialist insurer of exotic and small animals.

When you click the 'Get Quotes' button to enter Gocompare.com's pet insurance comparison service, you'll immediately see an option asking whether you're looking to cover a pet other than a cat or dog.

If you're looking to insure a rabbit, follow that link through to the ExoticDirect site, click on the appropriate image, answer a few quick questions, input your basic personal details and you'll be presented with your quote.

What will my rabbit insurance cover?

ExoticDirect offers two types of rabbit policy.

The first is a vet fee only policy covering treatment for illness or accident.

Policies cover multiple incidents of fly strike

The premium for each additional bunny added to the policy costs less than the premium for the initial rabbit.

This can be a good budget option but, due to the shared nature of the vets' fee benefit, this policy tends not to be recommended for owners with more than two rabbits.

The premier insurance option offers higher vet fees. This gives the full cover amount to each rabbit with a policy, and as such there is no discount for additional bunnies.

ExoticDirect does not offer lifetime cover for rabbits, which is reflected in the fact that their premiums are lower than other pet insurers which do offer such cover.

Other benefits of insuring with ExoticDirect[1] include cover for alternative therapies

Their policies do cover multiple incidents of fly strike.

Medically known as myiasis, this is an infestation with fly larvae, which needs to be removed.

Some rabbit insurers will pay out for one case of fly strike and then exclude it within the same policy, but ExoticDirect will cover treatment in the event of second and multiple cases.

Other benefits of insuring with ExoticDirect include cover for alternative therapies so long as they're recommended by a fully qualified vet, cover for your pet enclosure due to proven theft, malicious damage caused by theft and damage caused by fire, lightning, storm or wind or attempted theft.

As with any policy, check the small print thoroughly when the documents arrive.

You might assume certain things are covered when they are not, leading to unaffordable bills and the possibility of not being able to keep your bunny.

Rabbits do tend to make adorable pets and are a firm favourite with children but, before you buy one, you might like to read our guide to small pets to see if a bunny is the best option for you.

Find out more about your potential rabbit's diet.

By Rebecca Lees