By using the Gocompare.com website you agree to our use of cookies as described in our cookie policy. I Agree Learn more

£37: the cost of filling a Christmas stocking

05 December 2014

The UK’s top 20 stocking fillers revealed - Chocolate coins still top the list

  • Londoners spend most on Christmas stocking presents (£48) and those living in the North East the least (£16)
  • Chocolate coins (56%), sweets (48%), toiletries 41%), stationery (36%) and books (29%) top the list of stocking-fillers
  • 21% of parents say that they will never stop giving their children a Christmas stocking

On Christmas morning kids will wake up to stockings stuffed, on average, with £37 worth of goodies including chocolate coins, sweets, toiletries and new pens and pencils.  Confectionary pips the traditional Christmas fruit and nuts – this year, stockings are more than twice as likely to contain chocolate coins (56%) than a tangerine (24%) and only 15% of kids can expect to find any festive nuts.

The Christmas stocking survey*, commissioned by Gocompare.com, also revealed wide regional variations in the cost and contents of Christmas stockings.

While, on average, parents expect to spend £37 buying stocking presents, those living in London say it will cost them £48 while those in the North East estimate they will spend an average of £16.

Children living in London (38%) are more likely than any other region to wake up to find toys, dolls or board games at the end of their bed, while those living in the South East are the most likely to find pens and pencils (44%) or a book (38%).

 

Rank

Top 20 Stocking-fillers

National Average

Most likely to be found in

Least likely to be found in

1

Chocolate coins

56%

South West: 70%

North East:39%

2

Other sweets

48%

North West: 59%

London: 27%

3

Toiletries (bubble bath, soap, perfume, make-up, nail polish, cotton wool)

41%

South West: 61%

London: 31

4

Stationery items (pens, pencils and felt tips)

36%

South East: 44%

Scotland: 27%

5

Book

29%

South East: 38%

North East: 8%

6

Toy, doll, board games

25%

London: 38%

North East/East Midlands: 16% 

7

Tangerine

24%

Scotland: 39%

East 11%

8

Hair accessories

24%

South West:31%

London:15%

9

DVD

23%

Wales: 39%

Yorkshire & The Humber: 16%

10

Underwear

22%

Wales: 39%

West Midlands:10%

11

CD

18%

East Midlands: 35%

South West:10%

12

Hat, scarf, gloves

17%

South East 22%

Scotland: 11%

13

Jewellery

16%

East Midlands/South West: 28%

East: 5%

14

Nuts

15%

North East: 32%

South West:

7%

15

Jigsaw puzzle

13%

South East:24%

Scotland: 4%

16

Money

12%

Yorkshire & The Humber: 20%

East/North West: 6%

17

Toothbrush

12%

North West/South West: 19%

East Midlands: 5%

18

Gift card or voucher

12%

East:19%

North East: 0%

19

Playing or trading cards

10%

North East: 19%

Wales: 4%

20

Calendar

9%

East: 17%

Yorkshire & The Humber/Wales/Scotland: 4%



Of parents giving a stocking this year, when asked at what age they expect to (or did) stop giving their children a Christmas stocking, 21% of parents stopped/will stop by the time their kids are 18 and 6% between the ages of 19 and 30, however, 21% said ‘never’.

Claire Peate, customer insight manager at Gocompare.com commented: “For many families, Christmas wouldn’t be complete without stockings stuffed with a selection of festive food and goodies – so much so that many parents continue to buy stocking fillers for their grown-up children. But clearly there are different traditions around the country meaning you are more likely to get nuts in the North East and underwear in Wales!”  

-ends-

Notes to editors:

*On 14- 17 November 2014 an online survey was conducted among 2,004 randomly selected British adults age 18+ who are also Springboard United Kingdom Community members. The margin of error—which measures sampling variability—is +/- 2.2%, 19 times out of 20. The results have been statistically weighted according to the most current data on age, gender, region, and education from the most recent census data, to ensure the sample is representative of the entire adult population of the UK. Discrepancies in or between totals are due to rounding.