Young riders insurance

Compare young rider motorbike insurance quotes[1]

What’s young riders motorbike insurance?

It’s insurance especially tailored for riders of motorbikes, mopeds and scooters who are aged under 25.

As a young, or inexperienced, rider it’s important you take out adequate insurance to cover you for all eventualities.

Quotes for younger people tend to be more expensive, and come with higher excesses if you do need to claim.

But there are plenty of companies that specialise in covering young riders and can offer competitive policies and there are lots of things you can do to keep costs down.

young riders insurance

What do insurers class as a young rider?

Riders as young as 16 can get a provisional driving licence, take their Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) and ride a 50cc or less moped restricted to 45km/h (28mph), as long as they have the right insurance.

Generally, ‘young’ riders are classed - in insurance terms - as those aged between 16 to 25.

The cost of motorbike insurance generally drops substantially around the age of 25, just as it does with car insurance.

How much does bike insurance cost for young riders?

We found that the average cost of comprehensive motorbike insurance for under 25s with a full UK bike licence was £545. That's less than the average cost of £624 for bikers of that age with a provisional motorbike licence.

The average cost of comprehensive motorbike insurance policies for riders of all ages was £256. That's less than half the average price paid by young riders.[2]

What else affects the cost of motorbike insurance for young people?

How much your bike insurance costs will depend on:

  • Your age
  • The type of bike licence you need
  • Your riding history
  • The make and model of your motorbike
  • Your bike’s value
  • Its engine power (cc)

What level of motorbike insurance do you need?

There are three levels of bike insurance to choose from:

  • Third party only (TPO)

    This is the minimum level of insurance required by law.

    It only covers damage and injury you cause to other people and their things. It doesn’t cover your own vehicle.

  • Third party, fire and theft (TPFT)

    This covers damages and injuries caused to third parties and their belongings, as well as cover for your bike if it’s stolen or damaged by fire.

  • Comprehensive bike insurance

    The most inclusive option, fully comp cover includes third party damages or injuries, damage to your bike and medical cover for injuries you suffer due to an accident, fire or theft.

How to get young riders’ motorbike insurance

Insurers need to know a few details to give you an insurance quote:

  1. What you use your bike for

    Social, commuting or business purposes

  2. About you and your bike

    Name, date of birth, reg number and where your bike is kept overnight

  3. Your yearly mileage

    How many miles you ride annually

  4. Any modifications?

    Heated grips, storage racks and any other changes from the factory standard

  5. The value of your bike

    How much your bike is currently worth 

How to cut the cost of insurance for young riders

Although your insurance and excesses are likely to be more expensive if you’re under 25, there are still a few ways you can reduce the cost of your cover:

  1. Choose a sensible, unmodified bike

    While most small bikes tend to be cheaper to insure, fast, light motorbikes like small sports bikes are disproportionately expensive to insure. Motorbikes with modifications will also be more expensive to cover.

  2. Shop around

    Choose the cover you need and compare quotes to find the right insurance for a good price.

  3. Adding an experienced rider to your policy

    You can add a rider with more experience to your insurance to reduce the cost. Just make sure you’re honest about who the main rider is - lying about this is called fronting and it’s a type of fraud.

  4. Only pay for what you need

    Don’t add optional policy extras, like pillion cover or legal expenses, to your policy if you don’t need the cover.

  5. Advanced rider qualifications

    An advanced rider course will give you more experience and reduce your risk. Most insurers will recognise this by giving you a discount.

  6. Voluntary excess

    Excess for a young rider will be high, so consider whether you could afford to pay it. Though a higher voluntary excess might get you an insurance discount, it’s useless if you can’t afford it.

  7. Experience and no-claims discount

    Although not so useful when you’re starting out, you could benefit from future discounts by building up your experience and no-claims discount.

  8. Keep it safe

    Store your bike as safely as possible overnight, ideally in a garage or shed, to reduce the risk of theft. Invest in an immobiliser or alarm.

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