Travel insurance for Croatia

Compare travel insurance for Croatia and get the right cover for your trip.

Ceri McMillan - GoCompare travel insurance expert
Ceri McMillan
Updated 15 November 2022  | 3 min read

What do scuba-diving in sunken Roman galleons, touring a vineyard in the sunshine and strolling around a primeval beech forest have in common? You can do them all in Croatia.

There truly is something for everyone in this beautiful country. So, what are you waiting for? Find the right travel insurance for your trip today.

Key points

  • Choose between single and multi-trip policies depending on how many holidays you’re taking this year
  • You can receive reduced cost emergency healthcare with an EHIC or GHIC but it won’t replace travel insurance
  • Get a single, couple, group or family travel insurance policy

Do I need travel insurance for Croatia?

It’s not a condition of entry to the country but taking out travel insurance for your holiday to Croatia is essential.

The right policy can give you the peace of mind you need to relax and unwind, knowing that if a medical emergency happens or your baggage is lost, you’ll be covered and will be reimbursed for any costs you might incur.

What travel insurance do I need?

Decide between the following:

Single trip – You’re going on one trip and will only be visiting Croatia

Annual or multi-trip – You plan to take multiple trips within the period of a year to Croatia or different countries. Decide between insurance that covers the USA, Canada and the Caribbean and policies that exclude these countries. You’ll only be permitted to take a certain number of holidays per year

Couples – Policies that cover two people in a relationship

Group – Provides cover for up to 10 people that aren’t necessarily related

Family – Travel cover for a family of two adults and up to eight children who live together

Adventurous sports – Only available through certain insurers, this could be the right choice if you’re an adrenaline junkie who plans to bungee jump, rock climb or go horse riding while on holiday

Pre-existing medical conditions – If you want your medical condition to be covered by your travel insurance, you may need to find a specialist insurer

Water sports – Planning on white water rafting or sea kayaking while on holiday? You’ll need extra cover. Some activities may be covered under an adventurous sports policy. Always check the policy to see what is and isn’t included

What's covered

What travel insurance includes differs between policies but generally you can count on:

Medical cover – Most policies will pay up to £5 million for medical emergencies

Delayed departure cover – If your flight has been delayed for a certain number of hours, you could receive compensation, but your insurer may want to make sure you're not covered by the airline first

Cancellation or curtailment cover – Receive a payout if you have to cancel your holiday or cut it short due to an emergency

Repatriation – This covers the cost of flying you home to receive medical treatment

Baggage cover – Provides cover if your luggage is lost, stolen or damaged

Personal liability cover – Pays for your legal expenses if you unintentionally injure someone or damage their property while on holiday.

What's not covered

The following typically aren’t covered by travel insurance:

Pre-existing medical conditions – You may not be insured for medical issues that are a result of a pre-existing condition. Specialist providers may be able to help though

Ignoring government advice – If the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) has warned against travelling to Croatia, your policy could become invalid

Natural disasters and acts of terrorism – Generally these aren’t included in travel insurance policies

Dangerous activities and sports – A standard travel insurance policy will cover certain activities, but higher risk options will need a specialist policy or add-on

Criminal activity – Breaking the law will invalidate any claim that you make

Drinking excessively – Any claim that arises because you were intoxicated on alcohol or illegal drugs will be dismissed

Are EHIC or GHIC cards valid in Croatia?

The European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) and its replacement, the General Health Insurance Card (GHIC) are both valid in Croatia. This enables you to receive emergency healthcare in a state-run hospital as a Croatian national would. This means it’s normally free or at a discounted rate.

It’s not a replacement for travel insurance though, which can help you return home if you’re seriously ill or injured and cover ongoing treatment, if necessary.

Healthcare in Croatia

If you’re planning to stay in Croatia for longer than three months, you’re required to have health insurance.

Healthcare isn’t free in Croatia, so you’ll be required to pay towards your treatment (20%), as well as your insurer.

If you want to register as a Croatian resident, you’ll be required to have this in place before you apply for a visa. For more details on healthcare requirements in Croatia, take a look at the government’s advice.

Travel money in Croatia

The currency is the Croatian kuna, however many tourist areas will allow you to pay in euros. Watch out for this though because it’s highly likely that you’ll be overcharged. Exchange your money to the local currency to get the most bang for your buck and carry cash if you’re going off the beaten track.

Alternatively, the majority of shops, bars and restaurants will accept international bank and credit cards. Watch out for fees for using them abroad.

Do I need a visa for Croatia?

You don’t need a visa to visit Croatia, provided your stay doesn’t exceed 90 days within a 180-day period. Your trip won’t count towards your 90-day visa-free limit for visiting the Schengen area (a group of 26 European countries) either.

What are the passport rules for Croatia?

Always check your passport is valid well before your trip to Croatia.

It will need to have been issued less than 10 years before the day you enter the country and be valid for at least three months after you’ve returned home.

If your passport doesn’t fit these requirements, you’ll be refused entry.